Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 44, Issue 4, pp 969–974 | Cite as

Brief Report: The Use of Self-Report Measures in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorder to Access Symptoms of Anxiety, Depression and Negative Thoughts

  • Ann Ozsivadjian
  • Charlotte Hibberd
  • Matthew J. Hollocks
Brief Report

Abstract

The aims of this study were two-fold; firstly, to investigate whether self-report measures are useful and reflect parent-reported psychiatric symptoms in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and secondly, to investigate whether children with ASD are able to access and report their cognitions, a prerequisite skill for cognitive behavior therapies. Thirty children with ASD and 21 comparison children without ASD completed the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale and the Children’s Depression Inventory, with parents completing the parent version of both questionnaires. Intraclass correlations revealed that there was good agreement between ASD children and their parents on both measures, but only on the depression measure in non-ASD children. The children in both groups also completed the Children’s Automatic Thoughts Questionnaires; multiple regression analyses indicated that within the ASD group, child-rated scores on the CATS questionnaire were positively related to increased self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depression, but not in the comparison group, suggesting that children with ASD are able to accurately report their anxious and depressed cognitions. The implications of these results for both the practice and theory of CBT for children with ASD are discussed.

Keywords

Affective disorders Anxiety disorders Cognition Cognitive behavioral therapy Emotion Neurodevelopmental disorders 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann Ozsivadjian
    • 1
  • Charlotte Hibberd
    • 2
  • Matthew J. Hollocks
    • 3
  1. 1.Children’s Neurosciences Department, Newcomen at St Thomas’St Thomas’ HospitalLondonUK
  2. 2.Newcomen at St Thomas’St Thomas’ HospitalLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s College LondonLondonUK

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