Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 43, Issue 11, pp 2515–2525 | Cite as

Comparison of ICD-10R, DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 in an Adult Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnostic Clinic

  • C. Ellie Wilson
  • Nicola Gillan
  • Deborah Spain
  • Dene Robertson
  • Gedeon Roberts
  • Clodagh M. Murphy
  • Stefanos Maltezos
  • Janneke Zinkstok
  • Katie Johnston
  • Christina Dardani
  • Chris Ohlsen
  • P. Quinton Deeley
  • Michael Craig
  • Maria A. Mendez
  • Francesca Happé
  • Declan G. M. Murphy
Original Paper

Abstract

An Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnosis is often used to access services. We investigated whether ASD diagnostic outcome varied when DSM-5 was used compared to ICD-10R and DSM-IV-TR in a clinical sample of 150 intellectually able adults. Of those diagnosed with an ASD using ICD-10R, 56 % met DSM-5 ASD criteria. A further 19 % met DSM-5 (draft) criteria for Social Communication Disorder. Of those diagnosed with Autistic Disorder/Asperger Syndrome on DSM-IV-TR, 78 % met DSM-5 ASD criteria. Sensitivity of DSM-5 was significantly increased by reducing the number of criteria required for a DSM-5 diagnosis, or by rating ‘uncertain’ criteria as ‘present’, without sacrificing specificity. Reduced rates of ASD diagnosis may mean some ASD individuals will be unable to access clinical services.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnosis Prevalence DSM-5 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Ellie Wilson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nicola Gillan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Deborah Spain
    • 1
    • 2
  • Dene Robertson
    • 2
  • Gedeon Roberts
    • 1
    • 2
  • Clodagh M. Murphy
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stefanos Maltezos
    • 1
    • 2
  • Janneke Zinkstok
    • 1
    • 2
  • Katie Johnston
    • 2
  • Christina Dardani
    • 1
  • Chris Ohlsen
    • 2
  • P. Quinton Deeley
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michael Craig
    • 1
    • 2
  • Maria A. Mendez
    • 1
    • 2
  • Francesca Happé
    • 3
  • Declan G. M. Murphy
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s CollegeLondonUK
  2. 2.Behavioural Genetics Clinic, Maudsley HospitalSouth London and Maudsley NHS Foundation TrustLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of Social Genetic Developmental and Psychiatry Centre, Institute of PsychiatryKing’s CollegeLondonUK

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