Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 43, Issue 6, pp 1287–1297

Subcategories of Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Somer L. Bishop
  • Vanessa Hus
  • Amie Duncan
  • Marisela Huerta
  • Katherine Gotham
  • Andrew Pickles
  • Abba Kreiger
  • Andreas Buja
  • Sabata Lund
  • Catherine Lord
Article

Abstract

Research suggests that restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) can be subdivided into Repetitive Sensory Motor (RSM) and Insistence on Sameness (IS) behaviors. However, because the majority of previous studies have used the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R), it is not clear whether these subcategories reflect the actual organization of RRBs in ASD. Using data from the Simons Simplex Collection (n = 1,825), we examined the association between scores on the ADI-R and the Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised. Analyses supported the construct validity of RSM and IS subcategories. As in previous studies, IS behaviors showed no relationship with IQ. These findings support the continued use of RRB subcategories, particularly IS behaviors, as a means of creating more behaviorally homogeneous subgroups of children with ASD.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorders Repetitive behaviors Subcategories Repetitive sensory motor Insistence on sameness 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Somer L. Bishop
    • 1
  • Vanessa Hus
    • 2
  • Amie Duncan
    • 3
  • Marisela Huerta
    • 1
  • Katherine Gotham
    • 4
  • Andrew Pickles
    • 5
  • Abba Kreiger
    • 6
  • Andreas Buja
    • 6
  • Sabata Lund
    • 2
  • Catherine Lord
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Autism and the Developing BrainWeill Cornell Medical CollegeWhite PlainsUSA
  2. 2.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical CenterCincinnatiUSA
  4. 4.Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  5. 5.King’s CollegeLondonEngland
  6. 6.The Wharton SchoolPhiladelphiaUSA

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