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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 43, Issue 5, pp 1157–1170 | Cite as

A Comparison of Social Cognitive Profiles in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Matter of Quantitative but not Qualitative Difference?

  • Carly DemopoulosEmail author
  • Joyce Hopkins
  • Amy Davis
Article

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare social cognitive profiles of children and adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and ADHD. Participants diagnosed with an ASD (n = 137) were compared to participants with ADHD (n = 436) on tests of facial and vocal affect recognition, social judgment and problem-solving, and parent- and teacher-report of social functioning. Both groups performed significantly worse than the normative sample on all measures. Although the ASD group had more severe deficits, the pattern of deficits was surprisingly similar between groups, suggesting that social cognitive deficit patterns may be more similar in ASD and ADHD than previously thought. Thus, like those with ASDs, individuals with ADHD may also need to be routinely considered for treatments targeting social skills.

Keywords

Autism ADHD Social skills Facial and vocal affect recognition Pragmatic judgment Parent and teacher report 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Illinois Institute of Technology, Department of PsychologyChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Mind Research NetworkAlbuquerqueUSA
  3. 3.Alexian Brothers Neuroscience InstituteElk Grove VillageUSA

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