Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 43, Issue 4, pp 924–931 | Cite as

Age-Related Variation in Health Service Use and Associated Expenditures Among Children with Autism

  • Zuleyha Cidav
  • Lindsay Lawer
  • Steven C. Marcus
  • David S. Mandell
Article

Abstract

This study examined differences by age in service use and associated expenditures during 2005 for Medicaid-enrolled children with autism spectrum disorders. Aging was associated with significantly higher use and costs for restrictive, institution-based care and lower use and costs for community-based therapeutic services. Total expenditures increased by 5 % with each year of age; by 23 % between 3–5 and 6–11 year olds, 23 % between 6–11 and 12–16, and 14 % between 12–16 and 17–20 year olds. Use of and expenditures for long-term care, psychiatric medications, case management, medication management, day treatment/partial hospitalization, and respite services increased with age; use of and expenditures for occupational/physical therapy, speech therapy, mental health services, diagnostic/assessment services, and family therapy declined.

Keywords

Autism Economics Cost Expenditures Utilization Medicaid Age variation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zuleyha Cidav
    • 1
  • Lindsay Lawer
    • 1
  • Steven C. Marcus
    • 2
  • David S. Mandell
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Mental Health Policy & Services Research, Center for Autism Research, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaThe Children’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Center for Health Equity Research & Promotion, Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, School of Social Policy & PracticeUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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