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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 43, Issue 3, pp 643–662 | Cite as

Reliability and Validity of Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised, Japanese Version

  • Kenji J. Tsuchiya
  • Kaori Matsumoto
  • Atsuko Yagi
  • Naoko Inada
  • Miho Kuroda
  • Eiko Inokuchi
  • Tomonori Koyama
  • Yoko Kamio
  • Masatsugu Tsujii
  • Saeko Sakai
  • Ikuko Mohri
  • Masako Taniike
  • Ryoichiro Iwanaga
  • Kei Ogasahara
  • Taishi Miyachi
  • Shunji Nakajima
  • Iori Tani
  • Masafumi Ohnishi
  • Masahiko Inoue
  • Kazuyo Nomura
  • Taku Hagiwara
  • Tokio Uchiyama
  • Hironobu Ichikawa
  • Shuji Kobayashi
  • Ken Miyamoto
  • Kazuhiko Nakamura
  • Katsuaki Suzuki
  • Norio Mori
  • Nori Takei
Original Paper

Abstract

To examine the inter-rater reliability of Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised, Japanese Version (ADI-R-JV), the authors recruited 51 individuals aged 3–19 years, interviewed by two independent raters. Subsequently, to assess the discriminant and diagnostic validity of ADI-R-JV, the authors investigated 317 individuals aged 2–19 years, who were divided into three diagnostic groups as follows: autistic disorder (AD), pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, and other psychiatric diagnosis or no diagnosis, according to the consensus clinical diagnosis. As regards inter-rater reliability, intraclass correlation coefficients of greater than 0.80 were obtained for all three domains of ADI-R-JV. As regards discriminant validity, the mean scores of the three domains was significantly higher in individuals with AD than in those of other diagnostic groups. As regards diagnostic validity, sensitivity and specificity for correctly diagnosing AD were 0.92 and 0.89, respectively, but sensitivity was 0.55 for individuals younger than 5 years. Specificity was consistently high regardless of age and intelligence. ADI-R-JV was shown to be a reliable tool, and has sufficient discriminant validity and satisfactory diagnostic validity for correctly diagnosing AD, although the diagnostic validity appeared to be compromised with respect to the diagnosis of younger individuals.

Keywords

Autism ADI-R Reliability Validity Japan 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Declaration of interest: None of the authors have any conflict of interest to declare. The authors thank Dr. Masahiro Oshima, M.D., for recruiting children with ASD. Funding of this study was provided by a Research Grant from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan (H20-KOKORO-004: K.J. Tsuchiya, Y. Kamio), by a grant for the National Center for Child Health and Development (21S-3: K. J. Tsuchiya), by the Pfizer Health Research Fund (K. Matsumoto), and by Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (A) (No. 20591396: N. Takei). These funding sources had no role in the study design; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of the data; in the writing of the report; or in the decision to submit the paper for publication.

Supplementary material

10803_2012_1606_MOESM1_ESM.doc (152 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 152 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenji J. Tsuchiya
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kaori Matsumoto
    • 2
  • Atsuko Yagi
    • 3
    • 4
  • Naoko Inada
    • 5
  • Miho Kuroda
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
  • Eiko Inokuchi
    • 5
  • Tomonori Koyama
    • 5
    • 8
  • Yoko Kamio
    • 5
  • Masatsugu Tsujii
    • 1
    • 2
    • 9
  • Saeko Sakai
    • 10
    • 11
  • Ikuko Mohri
    • 10
    • 11
  • Masako Taniike
    • 10
    • 11
  • Ryoichiro Iwanaga
    • 12
  • Kei Ogasahara
    • 13
  • Taishi Miyachi
    • 14
  • Shunji Nakajima
    • 2
  • Iori Tani
    • 2
    • 15
  • Masafumi Ohnishi
    • 2
  • Masahiko Inoue
    • 16
  • Kazuyo Nomura
    • 16
    • 17
  • Taku Hagiwara
    • 18
  • Tokio Uchiyama
    • 19
  • Hironobu Ichikawa
    • 20
  • Shuji Kobayashi
    • 21
  • Ken Miyamoto
    • 21
  • Kazuhiko Nakamura
    • 3
  • Katsuaki Suzuki
    • 1
    • 2
  • Norio Mori
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Nori Takei
    • 1
    • 2
    • 22
  1. 1.Department of Child DevelopmentUnited Graduate School of Child Development at HamamatsuHamamatsuJapan
  2. 2.Research Center for Child Mental DevelopmentHamamatsu University School of MedicineHamamatsuJapan
  3. 3.Department of Neurology and PsychiatryHamamatsu University School of MedicineHamamatsuJapan
  4. 4.Shizuoka Center for Child and Family WelfareShizuokaJapan
  5. 5.Department of Child and Adolescent Mental HealthNational Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and PsychiatryTokyoJapan
  6. 6.Department of PsychologyShukutoku UniversityChibaJapan
  7. 7.Department of Child NeuropsychiatryGraduate School of Medicine, The University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  8. 8.Kokeijuku Preparatory SchoolKumamotoJapan
  9. 9.Chukyo University School of Contemporary SociologyToyotaJapan
  10. 10.Division of Developmental NeuroscienceUnited Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka UniversityOsakaJapan
  11. 11.Research Center for Child Mental DevelopmentUnited Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka UniversityOsakaJapan
  12. 12.Division of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Department of Health SciencesNagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical SciencesNagasakiJapan
  13. 13.Comprehensive Educational Science DivisionTokyo Gakugei UniversityTokyoJapan
  14. 14.Department of PediatricsNagoya City University HospitalNagoyaJapan
  15. 15.Faculty of HumanitiesTokai Gakuen UniversityAichiJapan
  16. 16.Graduate School of Medical Science, Center for Clinical Psychology, Tottori University Faculty of MedicineTottoriJapan
  17. 17.Department of Child PsychiatryHamamatsu University School of MedicineHamamatsuJapan
  18. 18.Division of Special Education, Department of Education and DevelopmentHokkaido University of EducationAsahikawaJapan
  19. 19.Faculty of Human Development and CultureFukushima UniversityFukushimaJapan
  20. 20.Tokyo Metropolitan Children’s Medical CenterTokyoJapan
  21. 21.Department of PediatricsKosai City HospitalKosaiJapan
  22. 22.King’s College of London, Institute of PsychiatryLondonUK

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