Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 43, Issue 3, pp 569–578 | Cite as

Effects of Computer Simulation Training on In Vivo Discrete Trial Teaching

  • Sigmund Eldevik
  • Iwona Ondire
  • J. Carl Hughes
  • Corinna F. Grindle
  • Tom Randell
  • Bob Remington
Original Paper

Abstract

Although Discrete-trial Teaching (DTT) is effective in teaching a many skills to children with autism, its proper implementation requires rigorous staff training. This study used an interactive computer simulation program (“DTkid”) to teach staff relevant DTT skills. Participants (N = 12) completed two sets of pre-tests either once (n = 7) or twice (n = 5) before brief DTkid training. These evaluated (a) simulated interactive teaching using DTkid and (b) in vivo teaching of three basic skills (receptive and expressive labeling; verbal imitation) to children with autism. Post-tests showed that DTkid training, rather than repeated testing, was significantly associated with improvements in staff’s ability to implement DTT both within the simulation and in vivo, and that the skills acquired showed both stimulus and response generalization.

Keywords

Autism Discrete-trial teaching Staff training Software simulation DTkid 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sigmund Eldevik
    • 1
  • Iwona Ondire
    • 2
  • J. Carl Hughes
    • 2
  • Corinna F. Grindle
    • 2
  • Tom Randell
    • 3
  • Bob Remington
    • 3
  1. 1.Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied SciencesOsloNorway
  2. 2.Bangor UniversityBangorUK
  3. 3.University of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK

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