Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 43, Issue 2, pp 382–394 | Cite as

Randomized Controlled Trial: Multimodal Anxiety and Social Skill Intervention for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Susan W. White
  • Thomas Ollendick
  • Anne Marie Albano
  • Donald Oswald
  • Cynthia Johnson
  • Michael A. Southam-Gerow
  • Inyoung Kim
  • Lawrence Scahill
Original Paper

Abstract

Anxiety is common among adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and may amplify the core social disability, thus necessitating combined treatment approaches. This pilot, randomized controlled trial evaluated the feasibility and preliminary outcomes of the Multimodal Anxiety and Social Skills Intervention (MASSI) program in a sample of 30 adolescents with ASD and anxiety symptoms of moderate or greater severity. The treatment was acceptable to families, subject adherence was high, and therapist fidelity was high. A 16 % improvement in ASD social impairment (within-group effect size = 1.18) was observed on a parent-reported scale. Although anxiety symptoms declined by 26 %, the change was not statistically significant. These findings suggest MASSI is a feasible treatment program and further evaluation is warranted.

Keywords

Autism Anxiety Adolescence Treatment 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This project was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health [1K01MH079945-01; PI: S. W. White]. We thank the participants in this study, their parents, and their teachers.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan W. White
    • 1
  • Thomas Ollendick
    • 1
  • Anne Marie Albano
    • 2
  • Donald Oswald
    • 3
  • Cynthia Johnson
    • 4
  • Michael A. Southam-Gerow
    • 6
    • 7
  • Inyoung Kim
    • 8
  • Lawrence Scahill
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA
  2. 2.Columbia Clinic for Anxiety and Related DisordersColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Commonwealth Autism ServiceVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA
  4. 4.Autism CenterUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA
  5. 5.Yale Child Study Center, School of NursingYale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  6. 6.Department of PsychologyVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA
  7. 7.Department of PediatricsVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA
  8. 8.Department of StatisticsVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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