Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 42, Issue 6, pp 1075–1086 | Cite as

The Structure of Autism Symptoms as Measured by the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule

  • Megan Norris
  • Luc Lecavalier
  • Michael C. Edwards
Original Paper

Abstract

The current study tested several competing models of the autism phenotype using data from modules 1 and 3 of the ADOS. Participants included individuals with ASDs aged 3–18 years (N = 1,409) from the AGRE database. Confirmatory factor analyses were performed on total samples and subsamples based on age and level of functioning. Three primary models were tested, including a one-factor model, the DSM-IV model, and the anticipated DSM-V model. Results indicated all models fit similarly. Module 1 ratings yielded better indices of fit across all models and higher inter-factor correlations than Model 3. Model fits were impacted by age and level of functioning. The lack of differentiation between models suggests that the structure of ASD symptoms is complex to measure statistically.

Keywords

Confirmatory factor analysis Autism Autism Spectrum Disorders Pervasive developmental disorders Symptoms 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Megan Norris
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Luc Lecavalier
    • 1
  • Michael C. Edwards
    • 1
  1. 1.Nisonger Center and Department of PsychologyThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities and the Department of PediatricsThe University of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA
  3. 3.Nationwide Children’s Hospital Child Development CenterColumbusUSA

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