Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 42, Issue 3, pp 409–418

Neurocognitive and Behavioral Outcomes of Younger Siblings of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder at Age Five

  • Zachary E. Warren
  • Jennifer H. Foss-Feig
  • Elizabeth E. Malesa
  • Evon Batey Lee
  • Julie Lounds Taylor
  • Cassandra R. Newsom
  • Julie Crittendon
  • Wendy L. Stone
Orginal paper

Abstract

Later-born siblings of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are at increased risk for ASD as well as qualitatively similar traits not meeting clinical cutoffs for the disorder. This study examined age five neurocognitive and behavioral outcomes of 39 younger siblings of children with ASD (Sibs-ASD) and 22 younger siblings of typically developing children (Sibs-TD) previously assessed in a longitudinal investigation starting in the second year of life. There were few group differences between Sibs-TD and Sibs-ASD on global measures of IQ, language, or behavior problems. Sibs-ASD did show vulnerabilities on measures of executive functioning, social cognition, and repetitive behaviors. These results highlight the importance of following sibling risk groups over an extended time period and employing measures targeting broader aspects of development.

Keywords

Autism Siblings Cognition Language Behavior Broad autism phenotype 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zachary E. Warren
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jennifer H. Foss-Feig
    • 3
  • Elizabeth E. Malesa
    • 3
  • Evon Batey Lee
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Julie Lounds Taylor
    • 1
    • 4
  • Cassandra R. Newsom
    • 1
    • 2
  • Julie Crittendon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Wendy L. Stone
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsVanderbilt Kennedy Center/TRIAD, Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryVanderbilt Kennedy Center/TRIAD, Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychology and Human DevelopmentVanderbilt Kennedy Center/TRIAD, Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  4. 4.Department of Special EducationVanderbilt Kennedy Center/TRIAD, Vanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  5. 5.Department of PsychologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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