Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 41, Issue 9, pp 1267–1276 | Cite as

Is Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified Less Stable Than Autistic Disorder? A Meta-Analysis

  • Emélie Rondeau
  • Leslie S. Klein
  • André Masse
  • Nicolas Bodeau
  • David Cohen
  • Jean-Marc Guilé
Original Paper

Abstract

We reviewed the stability of the diagnosis of pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). A Medline search found eight studies reiterating a diagnostic assessment for PDD-NOS. The pooled group included 322 autistic disorder (AD) and 122 PDD-NOS cases. We used percentage of individuals with same diagnose at Times 1 and 2 as response criterion. The pooled Relative Risk was 1.95 (p < 0.001) showing that AD diagnostic stability was higher than PDD-NOS. When diagnosed before 36 months PDD-NOS bore a 3-year stability rate of 35%. Examining the developmental trajectories showed that PDD-NOS corresponded to a group of heterogeneous pathological conditions including prodromic forms of later AD, remitted or less severe forms of AD, and developmental delays in interaction and communication.

Keywords

Validity Diagnosis Autistic disorder Pervasive developmental disorder Autism Meta-analysis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emélie Rondeau
    • 1
  • Leslie S. Klein
    • 2
  • André Masse
    • 1
  • Nicolas Bodeau
    • 3
  • David Cohen
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jean-Marc Guilé
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 5
  1. 1.Université de Montréal and Hôpital Rivière-des-PrairiesMontréalCanada
  2. 2.Autism Spectrum Disorders Clinic, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry DivisionDouglas Mental Health University InstituteMontrealCanada
  3. 3.Service de psychiatrie de l’enfant et de l’adolescentGH Pitié-SalpêtrièreParisFrance
  4. 4.Pierre et Marie Curie University of ParisParisFrance
  5. 5.Child & Adolescent Psychiatry DivisionMc Gill UniversityMontréalCanada

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