Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 41, Issue 4, pp 512–517

Brief Report: Preliminary Evaluation of the Theory of Mind Inventory and its Relationship to Measures of Social Skills

  • Matthew D. Lerner
  • Tiffany L. Hutchins
  • Patricia A. Prelock
Brief Report

Abstract

This study presents updated information on a parent-report measure of Theory of Mind (ToM), formerly called the Perception of Children’s Theory of Mind Measure (Hutchins et al., J Autism Dev Disord 38:143–155, 2008), renamed the Theory of Mind Inventory (ToMI), for use with parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This study examines the responses of parents of adolescents with ASDs and explores the relationship of parental responses on the ToMI to measures of autistic symptoms and social skills. Descriptive statistics were compared to previous samples; correlations and regressions were conducted to examine the ToMI’s criterion-related validity with social skills and ASD symptoms. Results support use of the ToMI with adolescent samples and its relationship to social impairments in ASDs.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Theory of Mind Social skills Scale evaluation Psychometrics Validity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew D. Lerner
    • 1
  • Tiffany L. Hutchins
    • 2
  • Patricia A. Prelock
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Communication SciencesUniversity of VermontBurlingtonUSA

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