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Social Story™ Interventions for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

  • Anastasia KokinaEmail author
  • Lee Kern
Original Paper

Abstract

A meta-analysis of single-subject research was conducted, examining the use of Social Stories™ and the role of a comprehensive set of moderator variables (intervention and participant characteristics) on intervention outcomes. While Social Stories had low to questionable overall effectiveness, they were more effective when addressing inappropriate behaviors than when teaching social skills. Social Stories also seemed to be associated with improved outcomes when used in general education settings and with target children as their own intervention agents. The role of other variables of interest, such as participants’ age, diagnosis, and skill development, the format of Social Stories, the length of the intervention, and the use of assessment (e.g., comprehension checks) also was explored.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorders Social Stories Meta-analysis 

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  1. References marked with an asterisk indicate studies included in the meta-analysis.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Special Education Program, College of EducationLehigh UniversityBethlehemUSA

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