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Sex Differences in WISC-III Profiles of Children with High-functioning Pervasive Developmental Disorders

  • Tomonori KoyamaEmail author
  • Yoko Kamio
  • Naoko Inada
  • Hiroshi Kurita
Original Paper

Abstract

Using the Japanese version of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III), 26 girls with high-functioning (IQ ≥ 70) pervasive developmental disorders (HFPDD) (mean age, 8.2 years) were compared with 116 boys with HFPDD (mean age, 9.0 years). Compared with the boys, the girls scored significantly higher on the Processing Speed index, Coding, and Symbol Search, but scored significantly lower on Block Design. Although both groups showed weakness on Comprehension in the verbal domain, the girls’ subtest profile in the performance domain was relatively even and significantly different from the boys’, which was characterized by a peak on Block Design. Such differences should be replicated, and possible behavioral, neurological, and genetic links to these sex differences should be clarified.

Keywords

Cognitive function High-functioning Pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) Sex differences Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III) 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported in part by a Research Grant from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, and by the Research Institute of Science and Technology for Society, Japan Science and Technology Agency. We would like to thank Ms. Yoko Hayashi, Ms. Keiko Shimoyamada, Mr. Hiromi Ishida, Mr. Junichi Yukimoto, Ms. Tomoko Nakano, and Ms. Mika Tobari for their help with data collection.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomonori Koyama
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yoko Kamio
    • 1
  • Naoko Inada
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Kurita
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Child and Adolescent Mental HealthNational Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and PsychiatryTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Mental Health, Graduate School of MedicineUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan

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