Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 39, Issue 1, pp 57–66 | Cite as

Age-Related Differences in Restricted Repetitive Behaviors in Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Anna J. Esbensen
  • Marsha Mailick Seltzer
  • Kristen S. L. Lam
  • James W. Bodfish
Original Paper

Abstract

Restricted repetitive behaviors (RRBs) were examined in a large group of children, adolescents and adults with ASD in order to describe age-related patterns of symptom change and association with specific contextual factors, and to examine if the patterns of change are different for the various types of RRBs. Over 700 individuals with ASD were rated on the Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised. RRBs were less frequent and less severe among older than younger individuals, corroborating that autism symptoms abate with age. Our findings further suggest that repetitive behaviors are a heterogeneous group of behaviors, with the subtypes of RRBs having their own individual patterns across the lifespan, and in some cases, a differential association with age depending on intellectual functioning.

Keywords

ASD Repetitive behaviors Children Adolescents Adults 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna J. Esbensen
    • 1
  • Marsha Mailick Seltzer
    • 2
  • Kristen S. L. Lam
    • 3
  • James W. Bodfish
    • 3
  1. 1.Waisman CenterUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  2. 2.Waisman CenterUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA
  3. 3.Neurodevelopmental Disorders Research CenterUniversity of North Carolina-Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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