Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 39, Issue 1, pp 42–56 | Cite as

Parents’ Experiences of Home-Based Applied Behavior Analysis Programs for Young Children with Autism

  • Corinna F. Grindle
  • Hanna Kovshoff
  • Richard P. Hastings
  • Bob Remington
Original Paper

Abstract

Although much research has documented the benefits to children with autism of early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI), little has focused on the impact of EIBI on families. Using a semi-structured format, we interviewed 53 parents whose children had received 2 years of EIBI to obtain detailed first person accounts of the perceived benefits and pitfalls of running a home program, and the impact of EIBI on family life and support systems. In general, parents were positive about EIBI, its benefits for them, their child, and the broader family. Interviews also, however, revealed some of the more challenging aspects of managing home-based EIBI. The implications of these findings for more supportive interventions for families on home programs are discussed.

Keywords

Early intensive behavioral intervention Family impact 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Corinna F. Grindle
    • 1
  • Hanna Kovshoff
    • 2
  • Richard P. Hastings
    • 1
  • Bob Remington
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Psychology, Adeilad BrigantiaBangor UniversityGwyneddUK
  2. 2.School of PsychologyUniversity of SouthamptonSouthamptonUK

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