Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 38, Issue 7, pp 1230–1240 | Cite as

The Autism Spectrum Quotient: Children’s Version (AQ-Child)

  • Bonnie Auyeung
  • Simon Baron-Cohen
  • Sally Wheelwright
  • Carrie Allison
Original Paper

Abstract

The Autism Spectrum Quotient—Children’s Version (AQ-Child) is a parent-report questionnaire that aims to quantify autistic traits in children 4–11 years old. The range of scores on the AQ-Child is 0–150. It was administered to children with an autism spectrum condition (ASC) (n = 540) and a general population sample (n = 1,225). Results showed a significant difference in scores between those with an ASC diagnosis and the general population. Receiver-operating-characteristic analyses showed that using a cut-off score of 76, the AQ-Child has high sensitivity (95%) and specificity (95%). The AQ-Child showed good test–retest reliability and high internal consistency. Factor analysis provided support for four of the five AQ-Child design subscales. Future studies should evaluate how the AQ-C performs in population screening.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Quotient—Children’s Version Autism Sex differences 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Nancy Lurie-Marks Family Foundation and the MRC, UK. Bonnie Auyeung was supported by a scholarship from Trinity College, Cambridge. We are grateful to the families who have taken part in this study over several years and to Rosa Hoekstra and Nigel Goldenfeld for valuable discussions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bonnie Auyeung
    • 1
  • Simon Baron-Cohen
    • 1
  • Sally Wheelwright
    • 1
  • Carrie Allison
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Autism Research CentreUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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