Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 38, Issue 4, pp 739–747

Young Adult Outcome of Autism Spectrum Disorders

Original Paper

Abstract

To learn about the lives of young adults with ASD, families with children born 1974–1984, diagnosed as preschoolers and followed into adolescence were contacted by mail. Of 76 eligible, 48 (63%) participated in a telephone interview. Global outcome scores were assigned based on work, friendships and independence. At mean age 24, half had good to fair outcome and 46% poor. Co-morbid conditions, obesity and medication use were common. Families noted unmet needs particularly in social areas. Multilinear regression indicated a combination of IQ and CARS score at age 11 predicted outcome. Earlier studies reported more adults with ASD who had poor to very poor outcomes, however current young people had more opportunities, and thus better results were expected.

Keywords

Autism outcomes Young adults with autism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentSunny Hill Health Centre for ChildrenVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Division of Developmental Pediatrics, Department of PediatricsUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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