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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 38, Issue 3, pp 411–418 | Cite as

Growth of Head Circumference in Autistic Infants During the First Year of Life

  • Aya FukumotoEmail author
  • Toshiaki Hashimoto
  • Hiromichi Ito
  • Mio Nishimura
  • Yoshimi Tsuda
  • Masahito Miyazaki
  • Kenji Mori
  • Kokichi Arisawa
  • Shoji Kagami
Original Paper

Abstract

This study analyzed the increase in head circumference (HC) of 85 autistic infants (64 boys and 21 girls) during their first year of life. The data were collected from their “mother-and-baby” notebooks. This notebook is a medical record of the baby’s growth and development delivered to the parents of all babies born in Japan. This is a retrospective study which gathered the data from the notebooks after the diagnosis of autism. However, none of the babies were known to have autism at the time the records were made. The head circumference at birth of these autistic children was similar to that of the average found in a Japanese Government Study of 14,115 children. However, it showed a marked increase at 1 month after birth. The discrepancy reached a peak at 6 months, while the difference became smaller at 12 months. Body length (BL) and body weight (BW) began to increase at 3 months, although at a rate smaller than the head circumference increase.

Keywords

Autism Head circumference Body length Body weight “Mother-and-baby” notebook Infant physical growth 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aya Fukumoto
    • 1
    Email author
  • Toshiaki Hashimoto
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hiromichi Ito
    • 1
  • Mio Nishimura
    • 1
    • 3
  • Yoshimi Tsuda
    • 1
    • 2
  • Masahito Miyazaki
    • 1
  • Kenji Mori
    • 1
  • Kokichi Arisawa
    • 4
  • Shoji Kagami
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Human Development and Health Sciences, Subdivision of Human Development, Department of Pediatrics, Institute of Health BiosciencesUniversity of Tokushima Graduate SchoolTokushimaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Special Support EducationNaruto University of EducationNaruto, TokushimaJapan
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsHinomine Medical CenterKomatsushima, TokushimaJapan
  4. 4.Department of Preventive Medicine, Institute of Health BiosciencesUniversity of Tokushima Graduate SchoolTokushimaJapan

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