Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 38, Issue 1, pp 72–85 | Cite as

Asperger Syndrome and Autism: A Comparative Longitudinal Follow-Up Study More than 5 Years after Original Diagnosis

  • Mats Cederlund
  • Bibbi Hagberg
  • Eva Billstedt
  • I. Carina Gillberg
  • Christopher Gillberg
Original Paper

Abstract

Prospective follow-up study of 70 males with Asperger syndrome (AS), and 70 males with autism more than 5 years after original diagnosis. Instruments used at follow-up included overall clinical assessment, the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders, Wechsler Intelligence Scales, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, and Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. Specific outcome criteria were used. Outcome in AS was good in 27% of cases. However, 26% had a very restricted life, with no occupation/activity and no friends. Outcome in the autism group was significantly worse. Males with AS had worse outcomes than expected given normal to high IQ. However, outcome was considerably better than for the comparison group of individuals with autism.

Keywords

Asperger syndrome Autism Follow-up Intellectual ability Outcome DISCO 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mats Cederlund
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bibbi Hagberg
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eva Billstedt
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. Carina Gillberg
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christopher Gillberg
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Neuroscience and PhysiologyGöteborg UniversityGöteborgSweden
  2. 2.Queen Silvia´s Child- and Adolescent HospitalGöteborgSweden

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