Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 37, Issue 10, pp 1925–1933

Poor Facial Affect Recognition Among Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

  • V. J. Hinton
  • R. J. Fee
  • D. C. De Vivo
  • E. Goldstein
Original Paper

Abstract

Children with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy (MD) have delayed language and poor social skills and some meet criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder, yet they are identified by molecular, rather than behavioral, characteristics. To determine whether comprehension of facial affect is compromised in boys with MD, children were given a matching-to-sample test with four types of visual recognition (Object, Face, Affect, and Situation matching) developed by Lucci and Fein. Within-group analyses on 50 boys with MD found decreased Affect matching relative to the other matching conditions. Between-group comparisons on 20 sibling pairs found the boys with Duchenne performed more poorly only on the Affect-matching condition. Thus, mildly impaired facial affect recognition may be part of the phenotype associated with Duchenne or Becker MD.

Keywords

Duchenne muscular dystrophy Becker muscular dystrophy Affect Facial emotion Pervasive developmental disorder Developmental disorder Dystrophin Neuromuscular 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. J. Hinton
    • 1
  • R. J. Fee
    • 2
  • D. C. De Vivo
    • 3
  • E. Goldstein
    • 4
  1. 1.Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center and the Department of NeurologyColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Gertrude H. Sergievsky CenterColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Colleen Giblin Research Laboratories and Departments of Neurology and PediatricsColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Department of NeurologyChildren’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite Children’s Medical CenterAtlantaUSA

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