Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 37, Issue 6, pp 1181–1191

Multiple Complex Developmental Disorder Delineated from PDD-NOS

  • Esther I. de Bruin
  • Pieter F. A. de Nijs
  • Fop Verheij
  • Catharina A. Hartman
  • Robert F. Ferdinand
Original Paper

Abstract

The objective of this study was to identify behavioral differences between children with multiple complex developmental disorder (MCDD) and those with pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). Twenty-five children (6–12 years) with MCDD and 86 children with PDD-NOS were compared with respect to psychiatric co-morbidity, psychotic thought problems and social contact problems using the child behavior checklist/4–18, the Dutch version of the diagnostic interview schedule for children—Version IV, the child and adolescent functional assessment scale, and the autism diagnostic observation schedule-generic. MCDD was associated with anxiety disorders, disruptive behavior, and psychotic thought problems. PDD-NOS was associated with deficits in social contact. MCDD differs from autistic disorder, and can also be delineated from PDD-NOS.

Keywords

MCDD Pervasive developmental disorders PDD-NOS Thought problems 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Esther I. de Bruin
    • 1
  • Pieter F. A. de Nijs
    • 1
  • Fop Verheij
    • 1
  • Catharina A. Hartman
    • 2
  • Robert F. Ferdinand
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryErasmus Medical Center Rotterdam/Sophia Children’s HospitalRotterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity Medical Center GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands

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