Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 37, Issue 4, pp 648–666 | Cite as

The Social Communication Assessment for Toddlers with Autism (SCATA): An Instrument to Measure the Frequency, Form and Function of Communication in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Auriol Drew
  • Gillian Baird
  • Emma Taylor
  • Elizabeth Milne
  • Tony Charman
ORIGINAL PAPER

Abstract

The Social Communication Assessment for Toddlers with Autism (SCATA) was designed to measure non-verbal communication, including early and atypical communication, in young children with autism spectrum disorder. Each communicative act is scored according to its form, function, role and complexity. The SCATA was used to measure communicative ability longitudinally in two samples of toddlers with autism spectrum disorder. Overall frequency of non-verbal communicative acts did not change between the two assessments. However, the form and complexity, the function and the role the child took in the interaction did change with time. Both frequency and function of communicative acts in toddlerhood were positively associated with later language ability: social acts, comments and initiations showed greater predictive association than requests and responses.

Keywords

Autism PDD Non-verbal communication Social-communication Measurement Assessment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Auriol Drew
    • 1
  • Gillian Baird
    • 1
  • Emma Taylor
    • 2
  • Elizabeth Milne
    • 3
  • Tony Charman
    • 2
  1. 1.Newcomen CentreGuy’s HospitalLondonUK
  2. 2.Behavioural & Brain Sciences UnitUCL Institute of Child HealthLondonUK
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK

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