Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 36, Issue 7, pp 849–861

Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders in Children with Autism: Interview Development and Rates of Disorders

  • Ovsanna T. Leyfer
  • Susan E. Folstein
  • Susan Bacalman
  • Naomi O. Davis
  • Elena Dinh
  • Jubel Morgan
  • Helen Tager-Flusberg
  • Janet E. Lainhart
Original paper

Abstract

The Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia was modified for use in children and adolescents with autism by developing additional screening questions and coding options that reflect the presentation of psychiatric disorders in autism spectrum disorders. The modified instrument, the Autism Comorbidity Interview-Present and Lifetime Version (ACI-PL), was piloted and frequently diagnosed disorders, depression, ADHD, and OCD, were tested for reliability and validity. The ACI-PL provides reliable DSM diagnoses that are valid based on clinical psychiatric diagnosis and treatment history. The sample demonstrated a high prevalence of specific phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, and ADHD. The rates of psychiatric disorder in autism are high and are associated with functional impairment.

Keywords

Psychopathology Autism Psychiatric interview Comorbidity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ovsanna T. Leyfer
    • 1
  • Susan E. Folstein
    • 2
  • Susan Bacalman
    • 3
  • Naomi O. Davis
    • 4
    • 5
  • Elena Dinh
    • 6
  • Jubel Morgan
    • 6
  • Helen Tager-Flusberg
    • 5
  • Janet E. Lainhart
    • 6
    • 7
  1. 1.Department of Psychological and Brain SciencesUniversity of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.MIND InstituteUniversity of California DavisSacramentoUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MassachusettsBostonUSA
  5. 5.Department of Anatomy and NeurobiologyBoston University School of MedicineBostonUSA
  6. 6.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Utah School of MedicineSalt Lake CityUSA
  7. 7.Utah Autism Research ProgramSalt Lake CityUSA

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