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Social Stories™ for Children with Disabilities

  • Georgina Reynhout
  • Mark Carter
Article

Abstract

A review of the empirical research literature on Social Stories™ is presented, including a descriptive review and single-subject meta-analysis of appropriate studies. Examination of data suggests the effects of Social Stories™ are highly variable. Interpretations of extant studies are frequently confounded by inadequate participant description and the use of Social Stories™ in combination with other interventions. It is unclear whether particular components of Social Stories™ are central to their efficacy. Data on maintenance and generalization are also limited. Social Stories™ stand as a promising intervention, being relatively straightforward and efficient to implement with application to a wide range of behaviors. Further research is needed to determine the exact nature of their contribution and the components critical to their efficacy.

Keywords

Social Stories™ autism Asperger’s syndrome behavior modification social skills special education 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Macquarie University Special Education CentreMacquarie UniversityNorth RydeAustralia
  2. 2.Macquarie University Special Education CentreMacquarie UniversityNorth RydeAustralia

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