Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 35, Issue 6, pp 831–838 | Cite as

Dysbindin (DTNBP1, 6p22.3) is Associated with Childhood-Onset Psychosis and Endophenotypes Measured by the Premorbid Adjustment Scale (PAS)

  • M. C. Gornick
  • A. M. Addington
  • A. Sporn
  • N. Gogtay
  • D. Greenstein
  • M. Lenane
  • P. Gochman
  • A. Ordonez
  • R. Balkissoon
  • R. Vakkalanka
  • D. R. Weinberger
  • J. L. Rapoport
  • R. E. Straub
Article

Straub et al. (2002) recently identified the 6p22.3 gene dysbindin (DTNBP1) through positional cloning as a schizophrenia susceptibility gene. We studied a rare cohort of 102 children with onset of psychosis before age 13. Standardized ratings of early development, medication response, neuropsychological and cognitive performance, premorbid dysfunction and clinical follow-up were obtained. Fourteen SNPs were genotyped in the gene DTNBP1. Family-based pairwise and haplotype transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) analysis with the clinical phenotype, and quantitative transmission disequilibrium test (QTDT) explored endophenotype relationships. One SNP was associated with diagnosis (TDT p=.01). The QTDT analyses showed several significant relationships. Four adjacent SNPs were associated (p values=.0009–.003) with poor premorbid functioning. These findings support the hypothesis that this and other schizophrenia susceptibility genes contribute to early neurodevelopmental impairment.

Keywords

Candidate gene genetic association transmission disequilibrium test quantitative TDT schizophrenia DTNBP1 childhood onset 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. C. Gornick
    • 1
  • A. M. Addington
    • 1
  • A. Sporn
    • 1
  • N. Gogtay
    • 1
  • D. Greenstein
    • 1
  • M. Lenane
    • 1
  • P. Gochman
    • 1
  • A. Ordonez
    • 1
  • R. Balkissoon
    • 2
  • R. Vakkalanka
    • 2
  • D. R. Weinberger
    • 2
  • J. L. Rapoport
    • 1
    • 3
  • R. E. Straub
    • 2
  1. 1.Child Psychiatry Branch, IRPNational Institute of Mental Health, NIHBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Clinical Brain Disorders BranchNIMH, NIHBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Child Psychiatry Branch, IRPNational Institute of Mental Health, NIHBethesdaUSA

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