Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 1–6 | Cite as

Sluggish Cognitive Tempo in Abnormal Child Psychology: An Historical Overview and Introduction to the Special Section

  • Stephen P. Becker
  • Stephen A. Marshall
  • Keith McBurnett
Article

Abstract

There has recently been a resurgence of interest in Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) as an important construct in the field of abnormal child psychology. Characterized by drowsiness, daydreaming, lethargy, mental confusion, and slowed thinking/behavior, SCT has primarily been studied as a feature of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and namely the predominately inattentive subtype/presentation. Although SCT is strongly associated with ADHD inattention, research increasingly supports the possibility that SCT is distinct from ADHD or perhaps a different mental health condition altogether, with unique relations to child and adolescent psychosocial adjustment. This introductory article to the Special Section on SCT provides an historical overview of the SCT construct and briefly describes the contributions of the eight empirical papers included in the Special Section. Given the emerging importance of SCT for abnormal psychology and clinical science, there is a clear need for additional studies that examine (1) the measurement, structure, and multidimensional nature of SCT, (2) SCT as statistically distinct from not only ADHD-inattention but also other psychopathologies (particularly depression and anxiety), (3) genetic and environmental contributions to the development of SCT symptoms, and (4) functional impairments associated with SCT. This Special Section brings together papers to advance the current knowledge related to these issues as well as to spur research in this exciting and expanding area of abnormal psychology.

Keywords

ADHD Attention deficit disorder Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder Comorbidity Concentration deficit disorder DSM-5 History SCT Sluggish cognitive tempo 

References

*The eight empirical articles included in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology Special Section on SCT (this issue) are noted with an asterisk.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen P. Becker
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stephen A. Marshall
    • 3
  • Keith McBurnett
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyMiami UniversityOxfordUSA
  2. 2.Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical PsychologyCincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical CenterCincinnatiUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyOhio UniversityAthensUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

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