Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 37, Issue 3, pp 431–441 | Cite as

Predicting Treatment and Follow-up Attrition in Parent–Child Interaction Therapy

Article

Abstract

Predictors of attrition from individual parent–child interaction therapy were examined for 99 families of preschoolers with disruptive behavior disorders. Seventy-one percent of treatment dropouts were identified by lower SES, more maternal negative talk, and less maternal total praise at pretreatment. Following PCIT, families were randomly assigned to an Assessment-Only or Maintenance Treatment condition. Higher maternal distress predicted 63% of dropouts in the Assessment-Only condition. Lower maternal intellectual functioning predicted 83% of dropouts from Maintenance Treatment. Findings highlight a continuing need for evidence-based retention strategies at various phases of engagement in PCIT.

Keywords

Attrition Child Disruptive behavior disorders Dropout Evidence-based treatment Follow-up Parent–child interaction therapy Prediction treatment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Child and Adolescent PsychologyNew York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Clinical and Health PsychologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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