Advertisement

An exploratory evaluation of a South African project-based curriculum module focused on authentic technological practice utilizing student portfolios and an open-ended questionnaire

  • Francois van AsEmail author
Article

Abstract

Learners today need more than the core subjects offered at school to be successful in the twenty-first-century. By involving technology student teachers in activities that are authentic to technological practice, as teachers, they should be able to provide stimulating and relevant learning for learners (Turnbull in Int J Technol Des Educ 12(1):23–40, 2002), which include twenty-first-century skills that enable them to develop minds and responsibility for the future (Snape and Fox-Turnbull in Int J Technol Des Educ 23:51–68, 2013). Previously, a fourfold set of criteria, developed by Ankiewicz (Proceedings of the PATT 29 conference, Marseille, France, 2015b), was applied to the first four semester modules of the academic major Engineering Graphics and Technology Education. It is found that there was a strong emphasis on conceptual knowledge with little time spent on practising procedural knowledge. Ankiewicz (2015b) anticipated that the final module might address these concerns as it was designed as a project-based module aimed at aspects of authentic technological practice. Students are expected to solve real-world technological problems. However, after the first year of offering the module the module’s success is unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore the extent to which the module succeeds in developing technology student teachers’ procedural knowledge. A qualitative study (Merriam in Qualitative research and case study applications in education, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, 1998) was conducted in which students’ portfolios and open-ended questionnaires were analysed. Indications are that the module contributed positively to enhancing the procedural knowledge of the students enrolled for this module.

Keywords

Technology education Technological process Procedural knowledge Authentic learning Twenty-first-century skills 

References

  1. Anderson, L., & Krathwohl, D. A. (2001). Taxonomy for learning, teaching and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. New York: Longman.Google Scholar
  2. Ankiewicz, P. J. (2013a). The alignment of the CAPS for technology in the senior phase with the philosophy of technology: a critical analysis. In Conference proceedings of the ISTE international conference on mathematics, science and technology education: “Towards effective teaching and meaningful learning in mathematics, science and technology”, Mopani Camp, Kruger National Park, 21–24 October 21–24, pp. 13–25.Google Scholar
  3. Ankiewicz, P. J. (2013b).’n Teoretiese besinning oor die implikasies van die filosofie van tegnologie vir klaskamerpraktyk. Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir Natuurwetenskap en Tegnologie, 32(1), Art.#386, 9 pages. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/satnt.v32i1.386.
  4. Ankiewicz, P. J. (2015a).’n Teoretiese besinning oor die implikasies van die filosofie van tegnologie vir kriteria vir vakkurrikulumontwikkeling en -evaluering’, Suid-Afrikaanse Tydskrif vir Natuurwetenskap en Tegnologie, 34(1), Art. #1170, 7 pages. http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/satnt.v34i1.1170.
  5. Ankiewicz, P. J. (2015b). The implications of the philosophy of technology for the academic majors of technology student teachers. In Proceedings of the PATT 29 conference, Marseille, France, April 7–10, 2015, pp. 13.Google Scholar
  6. Ankiewicz, P. J., De Swardt, E., & Engelbrecht, W. (2013). Grade 8 term 1 structures, communication skills and mechanical systems and control learner workbook. Johannesburg: University of Johannesburg.Google Scholar
  7. Binkley, M., Erstad, O., Herman, J., Raizen, S., Ripley, M., Miller-Ricci, M., et al. (2012). Defining twenty-first century skills. In P. Griffin, E. Care, & B. McGaw (Eds.), Assessment and teaching of 21st century skills. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  8. Creswell, J. W. (2005). Educational research: Planning, conducting, and evaluating quantitative and qualitative research. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.Google Scholar
  9. Doppelt, Y. (2003). Implementation and assessment of project-based learning in a flexible environment. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 13, 255–272.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Hérold, J.-F., & Ginestié, J. (2011). Help with solving technological problems in project activities. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 21, 55–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Hill, A. M. (1998). Problem solving in real-life contexts: Alternatives for design in technology education. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 8(3), 203–220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Jakovljevic, M., & Ankiewicz, P. (2016). Project-based pedagogy for the facilitation of webpage design. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 26(2), 225–242.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Jerald, C. D. (2009). Defining a 21st-century education. The Center for Public Education. Retrieved from http://www.centerforpubliceducation.org/Learn-About/21st-Century/Defining-a-21st-Century-Education-Full-Report-PDF.pdf. Accessed 3 March 2017.
  14. Lombardi, M. M. (2007). Authentic learning for the 21st century: An overview. Educause Learning Initiative. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Marilyn_Lombardi/publication/220040581_Authentic_Learning_for_the_21st_Century_An_Overview/links/0f317531744eedf4d1000000.pdf. Accessed 24 April 2016.
  15. McCormick, R. (1997). Conceptual and procedural knowledge. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 7, 141–159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Merriam, S. B. (1998). Qualitative research and case study applications in education. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  17. Mioduser, D., & Betzer, N. (2008). The contribution of project-based-learning to high-achievers’ acquisition of technological knowledge and skills. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 18, 59–77.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Norusis, M. J. (2010). PASW statistics 18. Guide to data analysis. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
  19. Salpeter, J. (2008). 21st century skills: Will our students be prepared? Technology & Learning. Retrieved from http://dca1to1.pbworks.com/f/21st+Century+-+will+our+students+be+prepared.pdf. Accessed 2 November 2015.
  20. Snape, P., & Fox-Turnbull, W. (2013). Perspectives of authenticity: Implementation in technology education. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 23, 51–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Spendlove, D., & Hopper, M. (2006). Using ‘electronic portfolios’ to challenge current orthodoxies in the presentation of an initial teacher training design and technology activity. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 16, 177–191.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Stein, S., McRobbie, C. J., & Ginns, I. S. (2001). Authentic programme planning in technology education. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 11, 239–261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Suto, I., & Eccles, H. (2014). The Cambridge approach to 21st century skills: Definitions, development and dilemmas for assessment. In IAEA conference, Singapore, 2014.Google Scholar
  24. Turnbull, W. (2002). The place of authenticity in technology in the New Zealand curriculum. International Journal of Technology and Design Education, 12(1), 23–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Science and Technology Education, Faculty of Education (APK Campus)University of JohannesburgAuckland ParkSouth Africa

Personalised recommendations