Information Systems Frontiers

, Volume 9, Issue 5, pp 493–504 | Cite as

Security as a contributor to knowledge management success

Article

Abstract

Security is an important topic, but is it important for Knowledge Management (KM)? To date, little mainstream KM research is coming through with a security focus. This paper asks why, and proposes that security be integrated into KM success models. The Jennex and Olfman (International Journal of Knowledge Management 2(3):51–68, 2006) KM success model is used to illustrate how security, specifically risk management, and the National Security Telecommunications and Information System Security Committee (NSTISSC) security model can be applied to KM management support and governance and KM Strategy. Finally, two case studies are provided that illustrate the application of risk management through governance to KM.

Keywords

Knowledge management Knowledge management success Knowledge management strategy Security Knowledge management governance Knowledge transfer 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.San Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.School of BusinessLa Trobe UniversityBundooraAustralia

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