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Association between CFH single nucleotide polymorphisms and response to photodynamic therapy in patients with central serous chorioretinopathy

  • Dandan Linghu
  • Hui Xu
  • Zhiqiao Liang
  • Tingting Gao
  • Zhaojun Lin
  • Xiaoxin Li
  • Lvzhen Huang
  • Mingwei ZhaoEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the complement factor H (CFH) gene and response to PDT in patients with CSC.

Methods

103 eyes from 93 patients with CSC were enrolled from Department of Ophthalmology of the People’s Hospital Peking University. Genotyping for selected SNPs in the CFH gene was performed, and multivariate linear analysis was used to identify factors influencing PDT treatment outcomes. Genetics associations between SNPs in the CFH gene and response to PDT in patients with CSC were analyzed.

Results

None of the seven SNPs examined in this study (rs800292, rs1061170, rs3753394, rs3753396, rs2284664, rs1329428, and rs1065489) showed significant associations with 1-month outcomes after PDT in patients with CSC (P > 0.05). Baseline BCVA changed at 1 month after PDT (P < 0.001), and baseline retinal thickness was associated with changes in retinal thickness at 1 month after PDT (P < 0.001). Age was significantly associated with resolution of SRF at 1 month after PDT (P = 0.004).

Conclusions

There were no significant associations between SNPs in the CFH gene and 1-month outcomes after PDT in patients with CSC. However, baseline BCVA, baseline retinal thickness, and age were significantly associated with response to PDT in patients with CSC. Larger studies with more power are necessary to further determine whether an association exists between SNPs in the CFH gene and PDT in patients with CSC.

Keywords

Single nucleotide polymorphisms Complement factor H Verteporfin photodynamic therapy Central serous chorioretinopathy 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Authors are required to disclose any possible conflicts of interest. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China Grants (81770943, 81470651); National key research and development program (2016YFC0904801, 2017YFC0111204); and the Research Fund for Science and Technology Program of Beijing (Nos. Z171100002217081, Z161100000516037). The funders had no role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish or preparation of the manuscript.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the Peking University people’s hospital research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dandan Linghu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Hui Xu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Zhiqiao Liang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Tingting Gao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Zhaojun Lin
    • 1
  • Xiaoxin Li
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Lvzhen Huang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Mingwei Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyPeking University People’s HospitalBeijingChina
  2. 2.Eye Diseases and Optometry InstituteBeijingChina
  3. 3.Beijing Key Laboratory of Diagnosis and Therapy of Retina and Choroid DiseasesBeijingChina
  4. 4.College of OptometryPeking University Health Science CenterBeijingChina

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