International Ophthalmology

, Volume 31, Issue 1, pp 25–28 | Cite as

Induction of bilateral ligneous conjunctivitis with the use of a prosthetic eye

Case Report
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Abstract

The purpose of this article to report a case of ligneous conjunctivitis in an anophthalmic socket, in respect of a 20-year-old woman. The subject woman had a history of left enucleation surgery presented with bilateral palpebral ligneous conjunctivitis and ligneous gingivitis. The hematologic study revealed a severe plasma plasminogen deficiency. The eyelid lesions were successfully treated with surgical excision, topical heparin and corticosteroid eyedrops. However, the ligneous lesions recurred bilaterally after she was fitted with a prosthetic eye and were refractory to intensive topical treatment with heparin and cyclosporin A eye drops. This case shows that the use of a prosthetic eye may induce ligneous conjunctivitis in an anophthalmic socket and normal eye which is refractory to topical treatment.

Keywords

Ligneous conjunctivitis Anophthalmic socket Ocular prosthesis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bülent Yazıcı
    • 1
  • Meral Yıldız
    • 1
  • Tayfun İrfan
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyUludag UniversityBursaTurkey
  2. 2.Dismer Dental Health CenterBursaTurkey

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