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Carbon dioxide capture and storage—liability for non-permanence under the UNFCCC

  • Sven Bode
  • Martina Jung
Original Paper

Abstract

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has recently been gaining more and more attention as a climate change mitigation option. However, as CO2 may re-enter the atmosphere after injection into geological reservoirs, the question of long-term liability has to be considered if an environmentally sound policy is desired. Apart from this aspect, additional complexities arise from the fact that CO2 capture and storage can be carried out in two different countries. A classification of CCS cross-border activities shows that not all cases with non-Annex I participation fall under the Clean Development Mechanism. This classification is based on the assumption that according to Article 1.8 of the Framework Convention on Climate Change, CCS would be considered an emission reduction at the source. Furthermore, we elaborate on the problem that seepage of CO2 from reservoirs located in non-Annex I countries—under current rules—would not be subtracted from the emission budget of any country. We discuss options for creating liability in these cases.

Keywords

Carbon dioxide capture and storage CDM Climate change Liability UNFCCC 

Abbreviations

CCS

Carbon dioxide capture and storage

CDM

Clean development mechanism

CER

Certified emission reduction

ECBM

Enhanced coal bed methane

EOR

Enhanced oil recovery

Former S.U.

Former Soviet Union

GHG

Greenhouse gas

HWP

Harvested wood products

IPCC

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

JI

Joint implementation

LULUCF

Land-use, land-use change and forestry

RC

Replacement costs

UNFCCC

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA)HamburgGermany

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