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Why on Earth Would Some People Reject Democracy? An Autoethnographic Reflection on Education and Democracy in Egypt

  • Islam KarkourEmail author
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Abstract

In 2013, thousands of Egyptians protested in the streets of Cairo in an effort to overthrow the country’s first democratically elected president only 1 year after he took office. Some of my acquaintances participated in those protests, chanting “we do not want democracy.” Several observers tried to analyze and understand this strange phenomenon of declining democracy after many Egyptians had waited so many years for it. However, using an autoethnographic method, I argue that any analysis of this phenomenon that does not include curriculum and education is inadequate. This autoethnographic essay argues that Egypt’s curriculum and its schooling system are fundamental factors that contributed to this phenomenon. Fundamentally, this paper discusses the theoretical and practical relationship between curriculum and democracy from an autoethnographic perspective by assessing the nature of this relationship both in democratic societies and in Egypt. Furthermore, an overview of the Egyptian educational system is provided to answer the basic question of this paper: why would some people reject democracy?

Keywords

Democracy Curriculum Egypt Arab spring 2011 Revolution 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The author declares that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Languages, Literatures, and CulturesUniversity of New HampshireDurhamUSA

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