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Interchange

, Volume 41, Issue 2, pp 123–132 | Cite as

Democratic Approaches in Education and Language Teaching

  • Edita Alo
Article
  • 190 Downloads

Abstract

In this paper the author asserts that as post- conflict Kosovo has emerged from the stage of emergency rehabilitation towards long-term development planning to independence, its peaceful and successful development largely depends on the development of a strong education system based on tolerance and human rights values. This paper looks at ways to promote an education system which accessible to all and also builds on the human potential of Kosovo by encouraging democratic behavior amongst the younger generation. The author asserts that traditional teaching in schools is no longer appropriate and looks at efforts to introduce new approaches to teaching. She suggests that a transformation is needed in order to have effective reforms. Part of this transformation suggests that educators in Kosovo will need to better understand that, while the country may be undergoing a transformation, teaching is a changing and dynamic profession with continuing demands and that education and professional development is a lifelong process.

Keywords

Kosovo transformational education second language teaching democratic education student-centered curriculum post-conflict development human rights 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of PrishtinaPrishtineKosovo

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