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Study of the Pigments in Colombian Powdered Coffee Using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

  • F. Gordillo-Delgado
  • A. Bedoya
  • E. MarínEmail author
ICPPP 18
  • 174 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. ICPPP-18: Selected Papers of the 18th International Conference on Photoacoustic and Photothermal Phenomena

Abstract

Biological pigments are chemical compounds that absorb light in the wavelength range of the visible region. They are present in all living organisms, vegetables being among their main producers. In this work, the photoacoustic spectroscopy technique was used to investigate some qualitative features related to pigments of ground and roasted coffee. The samples were collected at several Colombian commercial markets from different regions. Colombian coffee is known worldwide for its quality and flavor, being the main agricultural export product of the country. Therefore, it is important to study the composition and color of ground and roasted coffee in order to show quality and special characteristics of local varieties. Studying the content of pigments after roasting and grinding the coffee can allow a better understanding of the coloring process, which can lead to the definition of new criteria for evaluating the quality and other characteristics of the final product by comparing the optical spectra. In this work, the optical absorption spectra obtained by photoacoustic spectroscopy show absorption bands that match those of the pigments capsanthin, lutein and chlorophyll. In addition, an absorption peak in the near-infrared region was revealed, which also provides information regarding the composition of roasted and ground coffee.

Keywords

Coffee Organic materials absorption Photoacoustic spectroscopy Pigments 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Authors acknowledge the partial financial support of “Universidad del Quindío”, Colombia, through project #757. EM and AB also acknowledge support from CONACyT, SIP-IPN, and COFAA-IPN (Mexico). Authors also thank A. Cifuentes and S. Thrum for careful revision of the manuscript and for helpful comments and suggestions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratorio de OptoelectrónicaUniversidad del QuindíoQuindíoColombia
  2. 2.Instituto Politécnico Nacional (IPN)Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada (CICATA), Unidad LegariaMéxicoMexico

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