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International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 39, Issue 6, pp 1001–1004 | Cite as

Obituary: Siv Aina Jensen Leendertz (Born Siv Aina Jensen: 1973–2018)

  • Chantal Akoua-Koffi
  • Sandra Beermann
  • Sébastien Calvignac-Spencer
  • Emmanuel Couacy-Hymann
  • Helene De Nys
  • Bernhard Ehlers
  • Thomas Gillespie
  • Jeffrey Gilbert
  • Jan F. Gogarten
  • Sandra J. Laney
  • Felix Lankester
  • Fabian H. Leendertz
  • Benjamin Makepeace
  • Andreas Nitsche
  • Georg Pauli
  • Maude Pauly
  • Eystein Skjerve
  • Daniel Stern
  • Roma Thamm
  • Dominic Travis
  • Steve Unwin
  • Roman Wittig
  • Livia Wittiger
Article

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our colleague and friend, Siv Aina Jensen Leendertz. Despite her young age and having taken time off to raise her three children, Siv Aina was an accomplished veterinarian, biologist, and virologist who made insightful contributions to our understanding of wildlife disease ecology and great ape health. Siv Aina always had a love for animals and devoted much of her work towards their conservation and she is thoroughly missed by a diversity of communities. Most recently, she worked at the Robert Koch Institute in Germany, but her career began with a Bachelor of Veterinary Science at the University of Liverpool. She then worked practically as a veterinarian in England at the Armac Veterinary Clinic and from there, went on to work as a Research Assistant at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine. This position involved a two year project based full-time in Cameroon, where she developed her passion for helping both animals and...

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References

  1. Leendertz, S. A. J., 2016a. Testing new hypotheses regarding ebolavirus reservoirs. Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute.Google Scholar
  2. Leendertz, S. A. J., Junglen, S., Hedemann, C., Goffe, A., Calvignac, S., Boesch, C., & Leendertz, F. H. (2010). High prevalence, coinfection rate, and genetic diversity of retroviruses in wild red colobus monkeys (Piliocolobus badius badius) in tai National Park, cote d'Ivoire. Journal of Virology, 84(15), 7427–7436.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Leendertz, S. A. J., Locatelli, S., Boesch, C., Kücherer, C., Formenty, P., Liegeois, F., Ayouba, A., Peeters, M., & Leendertz, F. H. (2011). No evidence for transmission of SIVwrc from western red colobus monkeys (Piliocolobus badius badius) to wild west African chimpanzees (pan troglodytes verus) despite high exposure through hunting. BMC Microbiology, 11(1), 24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Leendertz*, S. A. J., Gogarten*, J. F., Düx, A., Calvignac-Spencer, S., & Leendertz, F. H. (2016b). Assessing the evidence supporting fruit bats as the primary reservoirs for Ebola viruses. EcoHealth, 13(1), 18–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Tchakouté*, V. L., Graham*, S. P., Jensen*, S. A., Makepeace, B. L., Nfon, C. K., Njongmeta, L. M., Lustigman, S., Enyong, P. A., Tanya, V. N., Bianco, A. E., & Trees, A. J. (2006). In a bovine model of onchocerciasis, protective immunity exists naturally, is absent in drug-cured hosts, and is induced by vaccination. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 103(15), 5971–5976.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chantal Akoua-Koffi
    • 1
  • Sandra Beermann
    • 2
  • Sébastien Calvignac-Spencer
    • 3
    • 4
  • Emmanuel Couacy-Hymann
    • 5
  • Helene De Nys
    • 6
  • Bernhard Ehlers
    • 7
  • Thomas Gillespie
    • 8
  • Jeffrey Gilbert
    • 9
  • Jan F. Gogarten
    • 3
    • 4
  • Sandra J. Laney
    • 10
  • Felix Lankester
    • 11
  • Fabian H. Leendertz
    • 3
  • Benjamin Makepeace
    • 12
  • Andreas Nitsche
    • 13
  • Georg Pauli
    • 13
  • Maude Pauly
    • 14
  • Eystein Skjerve
    • 15
  • Daniel Stern
    • 16
  • Roma Thamm
    • 2
  • Dominic Travis
    • 17
  • Steve Unwin
    • 18
  • Roman Wittig
    • 19
  • Livia Wittiger
    • 20
  1. 1.Centre de Recherche pour le DéveloppementUniversité Alassane OuattaraBouakéCôte d’Ivoire
  2. 2.Department of Infectious Disease EpidemiologyRobert Koch InstituteBerlinGermany
  3. 3.Project Group Epidemiology of Highly Pathogenic MicroorganismsRobert Koch InstituteBerlinGermany
  4. 4.Viral EvolutionRobert Koch-InstituteBerlinGermany
  5. 5.Laboratoire National D’appui au Développement Agricole/Laboratoire Central de Pathologie AnimaleBingervilleCôte d’Ivoire
  6. 6.Unité Mixte Internationale 233, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, INSERM U1175, and University of MontpellierMontpellierFrance
  7. 7.Division 12 Measles, Mumps, Rubella and Viruses Affecting Immunocompromised PatientsRobert Koch InstituteBerlinGermany
  8. 8.Department of Environmental Sciences and Program in Population Biology, Ecology and EvolutionEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  9. 9.International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent SocietiesGenevaSwitzerland
  10. 10.SJL Global ConsultingSeattleUSA
  11. 11.Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal HealthWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  12. 12.Institute of Infection and Global HealthUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK
  13. 13.Centre for Biological Threats and Special Pathogens (ZBS 1), Highly Pathogenic Viruses Centre for Biological Threats and Special PathogensRobert Koch InstituteBerlinGermany
  14. 14.Department of Infection and ImmunityLuxembourg Institute of HealthEsch-sur-AlzetteLuxembourg
  15. 15.Faculty of Veterinary MedicineNorwegian University of Life SciencesOsloNorway
  16. 16.Biological Toxins (ZBS 3), Centre for Biological Threats and Special PathogensRobert Koch InstituteBerlinGermany
  17. 17.Department of Veterinary Population MedicineUniversity of MinnesotaSaint PaulUSA
  18. 18.North of England Zoological Society, Chester ZooChesterUK
  19. 19.Department of PrimatologyMax Planck Institute for Evolutionary AnthropologyLeipzigGermany
  20. 20.World Wide Fund for NatureBerlinGermany

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