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International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 27, Issue 4, pp 1187–1200 | Cite as

Molecular Phylogeny of Nycticebus Inferred from Mitochondrial Genes

  • Jing-Hua Chen
  • Deng Pan
  • Colin Groves
  • Ying-Xiang Wang
  • Etsuo Narushima
  • Helena Fitch-Snyder
  • Paul Crow
  • Vu Ngoc Thanh
  • Oliver Ryder
  • Hong-Wei Zhang
  • Yun-xin Fu
  • Ya-ping Zhang
Article

Researchers are still discussing the classification of Nycticebus. We established a molecular phylogeny covering all recognized taxa in Nycticebus to provide information for further evaluation. We sequenced partial D-loop (ca. 390 bp) and cytochrome b genes (425 bp) from 22 specimens. We separated most of the major groups except for some mixing of Nycticebus. coucang coucang and N. bengalensis. Nycticebus pygmaeus diverged earlier from the ancestral stock than the other taxa. Nycticebus coucang menagensis was well discriminated from N. c. coucang. It may be possible to explain the mixing of Nycticebus coucang coucang and N. bengalensis by the hybridization between the 2 groups in the field. Although our data did not provide direct evidence for or against the new proposal that Nycticebus coucang javanicus be raised to the rank of a distinct species (N. javanicus), we have good evidence for regarding N. c. menagensis as a species.

KEYWORDS

classification mitochondrial gene molecular phylogeny slow loris 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This work was supported by grants from national 973 project of China, National Natural Science 243 Foundation of China (30021004, 30430110), Natural Science Foundation of 244 Yunnan, and Chinese Academy of Sciences.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jing-Hua Chen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Deng Pan
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • Colin Groves
    • 5
  • Ying-Xiang Wang
    • 6
  • Etsuo Narushima
    • 7
  • Helena Fitch-Snyder
    • 8
  • Paul Crow
    • 9
  • Vu Ngoc Thanh
    • 10
  • Oliver Ryder
    • 8
  • Hong-Wei Zhang
    • 2
  • Yun-xin Fu
    • 3
    • 11
  • Ya-ping Zhang
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular EvolutionKunming Institute of Zoology, the Chinese Academy of SciencesKunmingChina
  2. 2.School of Life ScienceShandong UniversityJinanChina
  3. 3.Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-resourcesYunnan UniversityKunmingChina
  4. 4.The Graduate SchoolChinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina
  5. 5.School of Archaeology & AnthropologyAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia
  6. 6.Department of Phylogensis and EvolutionKunming Institute of Zoology, the Chinese Academy of SciencesKunmingChina
  7. 7.Ueno Zoological Gardens, Taito-kuTokyoJapan
  8. 8.Zoological Society of San DiegoSan DiegoUSA
  9. 9.Kadoorie Farm & Botanic Garden CorporationHong KongChina
  10. 10.Department of Vertebrate ZoologyVietnam National UniversityHanoiVietnam
  11. 11.Human Genetics CenterUniversity of Texas at HoustonHoustonUSA

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