International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 26, Issue 3, pp 685–696 | Cite as

Y-chromosomal Markers Suitable for Noninvasive Studies of Guenon Hybridization

  • Anthony J. Tosi
  • Kate M. Detwiler
  • Todd R. Disotell
Article

Abstract

We examine previously-published TSPY sequence data to identify synapomorphies useful for tracking Y-chromosomal gene flow between hybridizing guenon species. We then describe a set of PCR primers and protocols that amplify many of these variable sites from feces. Such Y-chromosomal markers are potentially very useful to conservation studies because they may offer an early sign of introgression as a threat to the genetic integrity of a rare species. Moreover, the ability to survey these markers from feces greatly expands the utility of noninvasive studies.

Keywords

TSPY Cercopithecus hybridization fecal samples 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony J. Tosi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kate M. Detwiler
    • 1
  • Todd R. Disotell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyNew York University and New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology (NYCEP)USA
  2. 2.Molecular Anthropology LaboratoryNew York UniversityNew York

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