Advertisement

History of Mathematics in Korean Mathematics Textbooks: Implication for Using Ethnomathematics in Culturally Diverse School

  • Mi-Kyung Ju
  • Jong-Eun MoonEmail author
  • Ryoon-Jin Song
Article

Abstract

From a multicultural perspective, this research investigated to what extent Korean mathematics textbooks use history of mathematics. The results show even though educational use of history presented in Korean mathematics textbooks may provide a rich outlook, it does not encourage a fundamental change in the educational practice of school mathematics that has traditionally been entrenched in the Eurocentric narrative of mathematics. This suggests that the mathematics textbooks were not organized effectively to promote students’ understanding of diversity. Based on the results, we discuss the implications for the development of mathematics textbook from multicultural perspectives.

Keywords

Diversity Ethnomathematics Equity History of mathematics Multicultural competence 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea grant funded by the Korean government (NRF-2014S1A3A2044609).

References

  1. Bishop, A. J. (1988). Mathematics education in its cultural context. Educational Studies in Matheamtics, 19, 179–191.Google Scholar
  2. Byers, V. (1982). Why study the history of mathematics? International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 13(1), 59–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Cha, Y. K. (2008). Multicultural education as an alternative educational model in the era of globalization. Multicultural Education Studies, 1(1), 1–23.Google Scholar
  4. Cho, Y. M. & Lee, O. Y. (2010). An analysis of the results of a mathematics diagnostic test taken by multicultural Koreans in their first or second year of elementary school. Journal of Educational Research in Mathematics, 20(2), 103–119.Google Scholar
  5. D’Ambrosio, U. (1997). Ethnomathematics and its place in the history and pedagogy of mathematics. In A. B. Powell & M. Frankenstein (Eds.), Ethnomathematics: Challenging Eurocentrism in mathematics education (pp. 13–24). New York, NY: SUNY Press.Google Scholar
  6. D’Ambrosio, U. (2000). A historiographical proposal for non-Western mathematics. In H. Selin (Ed.), Mathematics across cultures: The history of non-Western mathematics (pp. 79–92). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer.Google Scholar
  7. D’Ambrosio, U. (2010). Ethnomathematics: Link between traditions and modernity. Rotterdam, The Netherlands: Sense.Google Scholar
  8. Eglash, R. (2000). Anthropological perspectives on ethnomathematics. In H. Selin (Ed.), Mathematics across cultures: The history of non-Western mathematics (pp. 13–22). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Eves, H. (2005). An introduction to the history of mathematics (W. H. Lee & H. G. Shin Trans.). Seoul, Koera: Kyungmoonsa.Google Scholar
  10. Fauvel, J. (1991). Using history in mathematics education. For the Learning of Mathematics, 11(2), 3–6.Google Scholar
  11. Fried, M. L. (2007). Didactics and history of mathematics: Knowledge and self-knowledge. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 66, 203–223.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Furinghetti, F. (2007). Teacher education through the history of mathematics. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 66, 131–143.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Grabiner, J. V. (1975). The mathematician, the historian, and the history of mathematics. Historia Mathematica, 2, 439–447.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Grattan-Guinness, I. (1973). Not from nowhere history and philosophy behind mathematical education. International Journal of Mathematical Education in Science and Technology, 4(4), 421–453.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Greer, B. & Mukhopadhyay, S. (2012). The hegemony of mathematics. In O. Skovsmose & B. Greer (Eds.), Opening the cage: Critique and politics of mathematics education (pp. 229–248). Rotterdam, The Netherlands: Sense.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Grugnetti, L. & Rogers, L. (2000). Philosophical, multicultural and interdisciplinary issues. In J. Fauvel & J. van Maanen (Eds.), History in mathematics education: The ICMI study (pp. 39–62). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer.Google Scholar
  17. Gulikers, I. & Blom, K. (2001). ‘A historical angle’, a survey of recent literature on the use and value of history in geometrical education. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 47, 223–258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Hong, S. S. (2012). Theory of equations in the history of Chosun mathematics (pp. 719–731). Daejeon, Korea: Proceedings of History and Pedagogy of Mathematics.Google Scholar
  19. Horng, W.-S. (2000). Euclid versus Liu Hui: A pedagogical reflection. In V. Katz (Ed.), Using history to teach mathematics: An international perspective (pp. 37–47). Washington, DC: The Mathematical Association of America.Google Scholar
  20. Jahnke, H. N. (2000). The use of original sources in the mathematics classroom. In J. Fauvel & J. van Maanen (Eds.), History in mathematics education, the ICMI study (pp. 291–328). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer.Google Scholar
  21. Jankvist, U. T. (2009). A categorization of the “whys” and “hows” of using history in mathematics education. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 71, 235–261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Jankvist, U. T. (2010). An empirical study of using history as a ‘goal’. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 74, 53–74.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Joseph, G. G. (1993). A rationale for a multicultural approach to mathematics. In D. Nelson, G. G. Joseph & J. Williams (Eds.), Multicultural mathematics: Teaching mathematics from a global perspective (pp. 1–24). Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Kim, M. K. (2005). An analysis of application of mathematical history into elementary mathematics education. The Korean Journal for History of Mathematics, 18(2), 43–54.Google Scholar
  25. Korean Minister of Education, Science, and Technology (2011a). Manual for textbook development. Seoul: Author.Google Scholar
  26. Korean Minister of Education, Science, and Technology (2011b). Mathematics curriculum. Seoul: Author.Google Scholar
  27. Mullis, I. V. V., Martin, M. O. & Foy, P. (2008). TIMSS 2007 international mathematics report: Findings from IEA’s trends in international mathematics and science study at the fourth and eighth grade. Chestnut Hill, MA: Boston College.Google Scholar
  28. Radford, L. (1997). On psychology, historical epistemology, and the teaching of mathematics: Towards a sociocultural history of mathematics. For the Learning of Mathematics, 17(1), 26–33.Google Scholar
  29. Radford, L. (2014). Towards an embodied, cultural, and material conception of mathematics cognition. ZDM Mathematics Education, 46, 349–361.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Radford, L., Furinghetti, F. & Katz, V. (2007). Introduction: The topos of meaning or the encounter between past and present. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 66, 107–110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Sfard, A. (1995). The development of algebra: Confronting historical and psychological perspectives. Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 14, 15–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Siu, M.-K. (2000). The ABCD of using history of mathematics in the (undergraduate) classroom. In V. Katz (Ed.), Using history to teach mathematics: An international perspective (pp. 3–9). Washington, DC: The Mathematical Association of America.Google Scholar
  33. Swetz, F. J. (2000). Problem solving from the history of mathematics. In V. Katz (Ed.), Using history to teach mathematics: An international perspective (pp. 59–65). Washington, DC: The Mathematical Association of America.Google Scholar
  34. Swetz, F. J. (2009). Culture and development of mathematics. In B. Greer, S. Mukhopadhyay, A. B. Powell & S. Nelson-Barber (Eds.), Culturally responsive mathematics education (pp. 11–41). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
  35. Toeplitz, O. (1963). The calculus: A genetic approach (L. Lange Trans.). Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago.Google Scholar
  36. Wood, L. N. (2000). Communicating mathematics across culture and time. In H. Selin (Ed.), Mathematics across cultures: The history of non-Western mathematics (pp. 1–12). Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mathematics Education, College of EducationHanyang UniversitySeoulKorea
  2. 2.University of Wisconsin MadisonMadisonUSA

Personalised recommendations