ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS’ UNDERSTANDING OF THE MEAN AND MEDIAN

Article

Abstract

This study provides a snapshot of elementary school teachers’ understanding of the mean and median. The research is presented in light of recent work regarding preservice teachers’ understanding of the mean. Common misconceptions are identified which lead to potential implications for teacher preparation programs. One of the primary concerns regarding increasing the standards expected of students to learn statistics is teachers’ preparation to address those standards. Exploring issues with teachers’ understanding of two of the most prominent concepts in the enacted curriculum provides a glimpse into the need to adequately prepare teachers to teach statistics.

Key words

content knowledge mean median statistics education teachers’ preparation 

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Copyright information

© National Science Council, Taiwan 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Teaching and LearningUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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