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MATHEMATICS TEACHERS’ CONCEPTIONS OF PROOF: IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH

  • Yi-Yin KoEmail author
Article

ABSTRACT

Current mathematics education reforms devoted to reasoning and proof highlight its importance in pre-kindergarten through grade 12. In order to provide students with opportunities to experience and understand proof, mathematics teachers must have a solid understanding of proofs themselves. In light of this challenge, a growing number of researchers around the world have started to investigate mathematics teachers’ conceptions of proof; however, much more needs to be done. Drawing on lessons learned from research and curricular recommendations from around the world, the main purpose of this paper is to review the literature on elementary and secondary mathematics teachers’ conceptions of proof and discuss international implications.

KEY WORDS

educational research mathematics teachers’ conceptions of proof proof teacher education 

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Copyright information

© National Science Council, Taiwan 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Educational OpportunityUniversity of Wisconsin–MadisonMadisonUSA

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