Millimeter-Wave Profiled Corrugated Horns for the Quad Cosmic Background Polarization Experiment

  • J. A. Murphy
  • E. Gleeson
  • G. Cahill
  • W. Lanigan
  • C. O’Sullivan
  • E. Cartwright
  • S. E. Church
  • J. Hinderks
  • E. Kirby
  • K. Thompson
  • B. Rusholme
  • W. K. Gear
  • B. Maffei
  • P. A. R. Ade
  • C. Tucker
  • B. Jones
Papers

Abstract

In this paper we report on the design and validation process for the profiled corrugated horn antennas, which feed the bolometer array of a cosmology experiment known as QUaD located at the South Pole. This is a cosmic background radiation polarization project, which demands precise knowledge and control of the optical coupling to the signal in order to map the feeble E- and B-polarization mode structure. The system will operate in two millimeter wavelength bands at 100 and 150 GHz. The imaging horn array collects the incoming signal via on-axis front-end optics and a Cassegrain telescope, with a cold stop in front of the array to terminate side-lobe structure at an edge taper of −20dB. The corrugated horn design process was undertaken using in-house analytical software tools, based on modal scattering, specially developed for millimeter -wave profiled horn antennas. An important part of the instrument development was the validation of the horn design, in particular to verify low edge taper levels and the required well-defined band edges. Suitable feed horn designs were measured and were found to be in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions.

Key Words:

profiled corrugated horn antennas polarization CMB 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Murphy
    • 1
  • E. Gleeson
    • 1
  • G. Cahill
    • 1
  • W. Lanigan
    • 1
  • C. O’Sullivan
    • 1
  • E. Cartwright
    • 1
  • S. E. Church
    • 2
  • J. Hinderks
    • 2
  • E. Kirby
    • 2
  • K. Thompson
    • 2
  • B. Rusholme
    • 2
  • W. K. Gear
    • 3
  • B. Maffei
    • 3
  • P. A. R. Ade
    • 3
  • C. Tucker
    • 3
  • B. Jones
    • 4
  1. 1.National University of IrelandCo. KildareIreland
  2. 2.Stanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  3. 3.Cardiff UniversityCardiffUK
  4. 4.California Institute of TechnologyPasadenaUSA

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