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International Journal of Historical Archaeology

, Volume 22, Issue 4, pp 800–842 | Cite as

Si Satchanalai Figurines: Reconstruction of Ancient Daily Life, Beliefs, and Environment in Siam during the Sixteenth Century

  • Atthasit SukkhamEmail author
Article
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Abstract

The Si Satchanalai figurines and ceramics applied with figurines in various shapes of humans and animals were one type of ceramics produced especially in the sixteenth century at the Si Satchanalai kilns located in Si Satchanalai city under the territorial control of the Sukhothai and the Ayutthaya Kingdoms which foreigners recorded the name of this region as “Siam.” They represent the mixed culture that came along with the unofficial and official foreign relations on politics and trade. Indian, Khmer, Lanna, Chinese Yuan and Ming, and Vietnamese arts and cultures were transmitted to Siam and became to be the important sources of inspiration for the local potters to create figurines and other forms of ceramic objects. The local daily life diet supplies, relationships in community, social organization, neighborhoods, activities, occupations and environments were other important sources of inspiration for the local potters.

Keywords

Ceramics Figurines Si Satchanalai kilns Sukhothai Ayutthaya Siam 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This article is dedicated to the memory of King Bhumibol Adulyadej (1927–2016), the king of the Chakri Dynasty, Thailand. This article based on the oral-presentation at the Second SEAMEO SPAFA International Conference on Southeast Asian Archaeology, held in Bangkok during May 30 to June 2, 2016 and was achieved with great support from Bangkok University. I especially would like to thank Dr. Dawn F. Rooney for her editing and comments.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Southeast Asian Ceramics Museum and School of Humanities and Tourism ManagementBangkok UniversityPathum ThaniThailand

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