The Archaeology of Missions in Australasia: Introduction

Article

Abstract

Missions have long been recognized as spaces of colonial contact and cultural exchange, and they are significant places in Indigenous landscapes today. However, archaeologists have only recently begun to explore such places across Australasia. This collection canvasses a range of approaches to this dynamic field.

Keywords

Missions Australasia Colonialism Exchange 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Australian Indigenous StudiesMonash UniversityClaytonAustralia
  2. 2.Geography and Environmental ScienceMonash UniversityClaytonAustralia

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