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Innovative Higher Education

, Volume 37, Issue 3, pp 227–242 | Cite as

The Politics of Dissertation Advising: How Early Career Women Faculty Negotiate Access and Participation

  • L. Earle Reybold
  • S. David Brazer
  • Lynne Schrum
  • Kirsten W. Corda
Article

Abstract

Dissertation committees are complex social arenas that underscore expertise, image, and peer relationships—all of which affect professional identity and advancement. This study presents a sampling of how early career women faculty members learn about and negotiate their participation on dissertation committees. Research questions focused on participants’ concerns about the social and political aspects of participation viz à viz peer relationships and faculty rewards. We analyzed interview data using both holistic and constant comparative methods, resulting in a working model of active participation across three domains: knowledge, access, and membership. We also identified developmental trends of dissertation committee engagement across the early career.

Key words

Faculty roles Dissertation advising Faculty socialization 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Earle Reybold
    • 1
  • S. David Brazer
    • 2
  • Lynne Schrum
    • 2
  • Kirsten W. Corda
    • 3
  1. 1.Qualitative Research and Higher EducationGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA
  2. 2.George Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA
  3. 3.University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA CircleSan AntonioUSA

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