Innovative Higher Education

, Volume 33, Issue 4, pp 217–228 | Cite as

Effects of Studio Space on Teaching and Learning: Preliminary Findings from Two Case Studies

Article

Abstract

Recognizing that traditional classrooms do not facilitate active learning, colleges and universities are increasingly converting traditional classroom space into studio space. Research indicates positive effects on student learning when studio classroom space is combined with active learning pedagogy, but the research does not separate the effect of the space from the effect of the pedagogy or address the effect of the space on teaching. The case studies described in this article suggest that studio space can launch teachers into active learning pedagogy and can increase the positive effects of that pedagogy on learning. Teachers and students perceived direct effects of the space itself.

Key words

classroom space active learning pedagogy facilities 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.English DepartmentClemson UniversityClemsonUSA

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