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Innovative Higher Education

, Volume 32, Issue 4, pp 221–233 | Cite as

Integration of Sustainability in Higher Education: A Study with International Perspectives

  • Kaisu SammalistoEmail author
  • Thomas Lindhqvist
Article

Abstract

This study examined the impact of a procedure implemented and used at one Swedish university to promote integration of the concept of sustainability into courses. The study is based on a literature study and a case study at the University of Gävle in Sweden, where faculty members are asked to classify their courses and research funding applications regarding the contributions thereof to sustainable development. The results of the study indicated that this procedure can indeed stimulate faculty members to integrate sustainable development in their courses. It is clear that the reported changes in courses were also influenced by other factors such as the increased general awareness of environmental issues.

Key words

curriculum environmental management indicator sustainable development 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors want to thank the faculty at the University of Gävle, who in various ways have contributed to this study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Technology and Built EnvironmentUniversity of GävleGävleSweden
  2. 2.International Institute for Industrial Environmental EconomicsLund UniversityLundSweden

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