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Hydrobiologia

, Volume 644, Issue 1, pp 1–13 | Cite as

Data integration for European marine biodiversity research: creating a database on benthos and plankton to study large-scale patterns and long-term changes

  • Leen Vandepitte
  • Bart Vanhoorne
  • Alexandra Kraberg
  • Natalie Anisimova
  • Chryssanthi Antoniadou
  • Rita Araújo
  • Inka Bartsch
  • Beatriz Beker
  • Lisandro Benedetti-Cecchi
  • Iacopo Bertocci
  • Sabine Cochrane
  • Keith Cooper
  • Johan Craeymeersch
  • Epaminondas Christou
  • Dennis J. Crisp
  • Salve Dahle
  • Marilyse de Boissier
  • Mario de Kluijver
  • Stanislav Denisenko
  • Doris De Vito
  • Gerard Duineveld
  • Vincent Escaravage
  • Dirk Fleischer
  • Simona Fraschetti
  • Adriana Giangrande
  • Carlo Heip
  • Herman Hummel
  • Urszula Janas
  • Rolf Karez
  • Monika Kedra
  • Paul Kingston
  • Ralph Kuhlenkamp
  • Maurice Libes
  • Peter Martens
  • Jan Mees
  • Nova Mieszkowska
  • Stella Mudrak
  • Ivka Munda
  • Sotiris Orfanidis
  • Martina Orlando-Bonaca
  • Rune Palerud
  • Eike Rachor
  • Katharina Reichert
  • Heye Rumohr
  • Doris Schiedek
  • Philipp Schubert
  • Wil C. H. Sistermans
  • Isabel Sousa Pinto
  • Alan J. Southward
  • Antonio Terlizzi
  • Evagelia Tsiaga
  • Justus E. E. van Beusekom
  • Edward Vanden Berghe
  • Jan Warzocha
  • Norbert Wasmund
  • Jan Marcin Weslawski
  • Claire Widdicombe
  • Maria Wlodarska-Kowalczuk
  • Michael L. Zettler
Review paper

Abstract

The general aim of setting up a central database on benthos and plankton was to integrate long-, medium- and short-term datasets on marine biodiversity. Such a database makes it possible to analyse species assemblages and their changes on spatial and temporal scales across Europe. Data collation lasted from early 2007 until August 2008, during which 67 datasets were collected covering three divergent habitats (rocky shores, soft bottoms and the pelagic environment). The database contains a total of 4,525 distinct taxa, 17,117 unique sampling locations and over 45,500 collected samples, representing almost 542,000 distribution records. The database geographically covers the North Sea (221,452 distribution records), the North-East Atlantic (98,796 distribution records) and furthermore the Baltic Sea, the Arctic and the Mediterranean. Data from 1858 to 2008 are presented in the database, with the longest time-series from the Baltic Sea soft bottom benthos. Each delivered dataset was subjected to certain quality control procedures, especially on the level of taxonomy. The standardisation procedure enables pan-European analyses without the hazard of taxonomic artefacts resulting from different determination skills. A case study on rocky shore and pelagic data in different geographical regions shows a general overestimation of biodiversity when making use of data before quality control compared to the same estimations after quality control. These results prove that the contribution of a misspelled name or the use of an obsolete synonym is comparable to the introduction of a rare species, having adverse effects on further diversity calculations. The quality checked data source is now ready to test geographical and temporal hypotheses on a large scale.

Keywords

Macrobenthos Plankton Data acquisition Quality control Biogeography 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The first author would like to thank all LargeNet scientists for their patience in answering the many questions concerning the submitted datasets. The LargeNet project has been carried out in the framework of the MarBEF Network of Excellence ‘Marine Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning’ which is funded by the Sustainable Development, Global Change and Ecosystem Programme of the European Community’s Sixth Framework Programme (Contract No. GOCE-CT-2003-505446). This publication is contribution number 09041 of MarBEF.

Supplementary material

10750_2010_108_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (122 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 121 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leen Vandepitte
    • 1
  • Bart Vanhoorne
    • 1
  • Alexandra Kraberg
    • 2
  • Natalie Anisimova
    • 3
  • Chryssanthi Antoniadou
    • 4
  • Rita Araújo
    • 5
  • Inka Bartsch
    • 6
  • Beatriz Beker
    • 7
  • Lisandro Benedetti-Cecchi
    • 8
  • Iacopo Bertocci
    • 8
  • Sabine Cochrane
    • 9
  • Keith Cooper
    • 10
  • Johan Craeymeersch
    • 11
  • Epaminondas Christou
    • 12
  • Dennis J. Crisp
    • 13
  • Salve Dahle
    • 9
  • Marilyse de Boissier
    • 7
  • Mario de Kluijver
    • 14
  • Stanislav Denisenko
    • 15
  • Doris De Vito
    • 16
  • Gerard Duineveld
    • 17
  • Vincent Escaravage
    • 17
  • Dirk Fleischer
    • 18
  • Simona Fraschetti
    • 16
  • Adriana Giangrande
    • 16
  • Carlo Heip
    • 17
    • 19
  • Herman Hummel
    • 17
  • Urszula Janas
    • 20
  • Rolf Karez
    • 21
  • Monika Kedra
    • 22
  • Paul Kingston
    • 23
  • Ralph Kuhlenkamp
    • 24
  • Maurice Libes
    • 7
  • Peter Martens
    • 25
  • Jan Mees
    • 1
  • Nova Mieszkowska
    • 13
  • Stella Mudrak
    • 20
  • Ivka Munda
    • 26
  • Sotiris Orfanidis
    • 27
  • Martina Orlando-Bonaca
    • 28
  • Rune Palerud
    • 9
  • Eike Rachor
    • 6
  • Katharina Reichert
    • 2
  • Heye Rumohr
    • 18
  • Doris Schiedek
    • 29
  • Philipp Schubert
    • 18
  • Wil C. H. Sistermans
    • 17
  • Isabel Sousa Pinto
    • 5
  • Alan J. Southward
    • 13
  • Antonio Terlizzi
    • 16
  • Evagelia Tsiaga
    • 27
  • Justus E. E. van Beusekom
    • 25
  • Edward Vanden Berghe
    • 1
    • 30
  • Jan Warzocha
    • 31
  • Norbert Wasmund
    • 32
  • Jan Marcin Weslawski
    • 22
  • Claire Widdicombe
    • 33
  • Maria Wlodarska-Kowalczuk
    • 22
  • Michael L. Zettler
    • 32
  1. 1.Vlaams Instituut voor de ZeeOostendeBelgium
  2. 2.Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine ResearchBiologische Anstalt HelgolandHelgolandGermany
  3. 3.PINROMurmanskRussia
  4. 4.Department of Biology, Laboratory of ZoologyAristotle University of ThessalonikiThessalonikiGreece
  5. 5.Centre of Marine and Environmental ResearchUniversity of PortoPortoPortugal
  6. 6.Alfred Wegener Institue for Polar and Marine ResearchBremerhavenGermany
  7. 7.Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre d’Océanologie de MarseilleStation Marine d’EndoumeMarseilleFrance
  8. 8.Dipartimento di BiologiaUniversità di PisaPisaItaly
  9. 9.Akvaplan-NivaPolar Environmental CentreTromsøNorway
  10. 10.Centre for EnvironmentFisheries and Aquaculture ScienceLowestoftUK
  11. 11.Wageningen IMARES, Institute for Marine Resources and Ecosystem StudiesYersekeThe Netherlands
  12. 12.Hellenic Centre for Marine ResearchAnavissosGreece
  13. 13.Marine Biological Association of the UK (MBA), The Laboratory, Citadel HillPlymouthUK
  14. 14.Expert Center For Taxonomic Identification (ETI)AmsterdamThe Netherlands
  15. 15.Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of ScienceSt. PetersburgRussia
  16. 16.Department of Biological and Environmental Science and Technologies, Laboratory of Zoology and Marine Biology (LZMB)University of SalentoLecceItaly
  17. 17.Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO)YersekeThe Netherlands
  18. 18.Leibniz Institute for Marine SciencesIFM-GEOMARKielGermany
  19. 19.Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ)AB Den Burg, TexelThe Netherlands
  20. 20.Institute of OceanographyUniversity of GdanskGdyniaPoland
  21. 21.State Agency for AgricultureEnvironment and Rural Areas (LLUR)FlintbekGermany
  22. 22.Institute of OceanologyPolish Academy of SciencesSopotPoland
  23. 23.Institute for Offshore EngineeringHeriot-Watt UniversityEdinburghScotland, UK
  24. 24.PhycomarinHamburgGermany
  25. 25.Alfred Wegener Institue for Polar and Marine ResearchWadden Sea Station SyltList/SyltGermany
  26. 26.Scientific Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and ArtsLjubljanaSlovenia
  27. 27.National Agricultural Research FoundationFisheries Research InstituteNea Peramos, KavalaGreece
  28. 28.Marine Biology StationNational Institute of BiologyPiranSlovenia
  29. 29.National Environmental Research InstituteUniversity of AarhusRoskildeDenmark
  30. 30.Institute of Marine and Coastal SciencesRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA
  31. 31.Department of Fisheries Oceanography and Marine EcologySea Fisheries InstituteGdyniaPoland
  32. 32.Leipniz Institute for Baltic Sea ResearchRostock WarnemündeGermany
  33. 33.Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML)PlymouthUK

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