Hydrobiologia

, Volume 584, Issue 1, pp 37–48

Sediment phosphorus cycling in a large shallow lake: spatio-temporal variation in phosphorus pools and release

  • Bryan M. Spears
  • Laurence Carvalho
  • Rupert Perkins
  • Alex Kirika
  • David M. Paterson
Shallow Lakes

DOI: 10.1007/s10750-007-0610-0

Cite this article as:
Spears, B.M., Carvalho, L., Perkins, R. et al. Hydrobiologia (2007) 584: 37. doi:10.1007/s10750-007-0610-0

Abstract

Sediment and water column phosphorus fractions were recorded monthly for one year (April 2004–April 2005) in a shallow lake recovering from nutrient pollution (Loch Leven, Scotland). Equilibrium phosphate concentration (EPC0) and gross sediment phosphorus (P) release rates were estimated from laboratory experiments. Pore water and organic P pools were lowest during warm water periods whereas bottom water P was lowest during cold water periods. Reductant-soluble, organic, metal oxide-adsorbed, residual and sediment total phosphorus pools all varied significantly with overlying water depth. Short-term, high magnitude, redox initiated P release events occurred in late summer and winter as a result of anoxic sediment conditions. Lower magnitude long-term release conditions were maintained for most of the year, most likely as a result of organic P cycling and maintenance of high concentration gradients between the pore and bottom water P pools. Estimates of summer P uptake/release rates, across an intact sediment-water interface, suggested that maximum gross internal release was ~12 mg SRP m−2 lake surface area d−1 with EPC0 values ranging between 180 and 270 μg P L−1. This study highlights the biological mediation of internal loading in shallow eutrophic lakes, and in particular, the role of sediment algae in decreasing, and sediment bacteria in enhancing, sediment P release.

Keywords

Sediment Phosphorus Mobility Bio-regulation Seasonality 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bryan M. Spears
    • 1
    • 3
  • Laurence Carvalho
    • 1
  • Rupert Perkins
    • 2
  • Alex Kirika
    • 1
  • David M. Paterson
    • 3
  1. 1.Centre for Ecology and Hydrology EdinburghPenicuikScotland, UK
  2. 2.School of Earth, Ocean and Planetary SciencesCardiff UniversityCardiffWales, UK
  3. 3.Sediment Ecology Research Group, Gatty Marine LaboratoryUniversity of St. AndrewsFifeScotland, UK

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